Structural network topology relates to tissue properties in multiple sclerosis

Researchers from the department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Amsterdam UMC – location VUmc have combined MRI and histology to determine the the micro-scale correlates of macro-scale network measures of segregation and integration in multiple sclerosis.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30467603

OBJECTIVE:

Abnormalities in segregative and integrative properties of brain networks have been observed in multiple sclerosis (MS) and are related to clinical functioning. This study aims to investigate the micro-scale correlates of macro-scale network measures of segregation and integration in MS.

METHODS:

Eight MS patients underwent post-mortem in situ whole-brain diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and subsequent brain dissection. Macro-scale structural network topology was derived from DT data using graph theory. Clustering coefficient and mean white matter (WM) fiber length were measures of nodal segregation and integration. Thirty-three tissue blocks were collected from five cortical brain regions. Using immunohistochemistry micro-scale tissue properties were evaluated, including, neuronal size, neuronal density, axonal density and total cell density. Nodal network properties and tissue properties were correlated.

RESULTS:

A negative correlation between clustering coefficient and WM fiber length was found. Higher clustering coefficient was associated with smaller neuronal size and lower axonal density, and vice versa for fiber length. Higher whole-brain WM lesion load was associated with higher whole-brain clustering, shorter whole-brain fiber length, lower neuronal size and axonal density.

CONCLUSION:

Structural network properties on MRI associate with neuronal size and axonal density, suggesting that macro-scale network measures may grasp cortical neuroaxonal degeneration in MS.

Detailed structural orchestration of Lewy pathology in Parkinson’s disease as revealed by 3D multicolor STED microscopy

Colleagues from the department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Amsterdam UMC – location VUmc, have recently published on post-translational modifications of alpha-synuclein (aSyn), in particular phosphorylation at Serine 129 (Ser129-p) and truncation of its C-terminus (CTT) in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Read the manuscript, with exceptional pictures, here: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/11/14/470476

Erasmus MC – VUmc collaboration discover new gene involved in the development of Parkinson’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

An international team led by Prof. Vincenzo Bonifati from the Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Clinical Genetics, has discovered for the first time variants in a gene (termed LRP10) in patients with familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and dementia, and Dementia with Lewy bodies. The paper reporting this discovery will be published in The Lancet Neurology this week. ‘This discovery opens a novel window on the molecular mechanisms of these common neurodegenerative diseases, and might pave the way to the identification of novel biomarkers and novel disease-modifying therapies’, says Prof. Bonifati.

 

See website